Tax Breaks vs. Budget Cuts

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The chart below compares the 10 safety-net programs slated for deep cuts with the cost of the tax breaks that should also be considered for reduction or elimination to bring the budget into balance.

The column on the left is a list of safety-net programs that have already been targets of the House leadership’s budget ax. The column on the right is the cost of specified tax breaks.

The crazy thing about these tax breaks is that they are not voted on as a part of the budget-making process. For a more detailed explanation, go here.

 

Women’s History Month: Does Being a Mother Count?

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I should have written this post at the beginning of the month instead of at the end, but somehow the fact that March was Women’s History Month got pushed into the background of my mind. And isn’t that what usually happens to women’s history? It’s always getting pushed into the background. It’s always been that way and I fear that it always will be.

Sure, more women are being recognized for their accomplishments these days. But will they be considered noteworthy in the future? Will Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin receive as much attention among biographers and historians as Barack Obama, for instance? (How many women know that Geraldine Ferraro—who just died the other day—was actually the first woman vice-presidential candidate?)

And even though women’s studies has become a staple of almost every university’s curriculum, how many people really know anything about women’s history? Or even care?

What I find amazing is how little women know about their own history. Naturally, feminists and women’s studies majors know a lot. But what about the average woman? Does she know how many women we have in Congress? Or who was the first female candidate for president? (Hint: it wasn’t Hillary Clinton.) Or what role women have played in war and peace?

What about this little tidbit?

On November 11, 1865, Dr. Mary Edwards Walker was awarded a Medal of Honor for her service as a surgeon during the Civil War. She was the only woman to receive such an honor, the country’s highest military award. Unfortunately, in 1917, Dr. Walker’s medal was taken away, along with 910 others, when Congress changed the rules of the award to include only “actual combat with an enemy.” Dr. Walker, however, refused to give back the medal and wore it every day until her death in 1919. After her death, she was re-awarded the Medal of Honor in 1977.

Too many people reduce women’s roles in life to that of wives and mothers. For example, Susannah Wesley is known as the “Mother of Methodism” not because she was a preacher or minister, but because two of her 19 children went on to found Methodism.

Probably the most revered woman in the world is Mary, the mother of Jesus. She is known for her faithfulness and obedience to God in her role  as a mother.

These examples aren’t meant to diminish women who are mothers. I happen to believe that being a mother is an incredibly difficult job and that women who are mothers deserve even more credit than they are given. (Ironically, though we put mothers on a pedestal, we do little to support them. America in particular is notorious for not being mother-friendly. )

Ever since  Louise Story’s article appeared in The New York Times about college-educated women choosing to stay home with their children, feminists have raised the question of whether or not being a stay-at-home mom (SAHM) is the best use of a woman’s talents and education.  And recently, when Natalie Portman announced at the Academy Awards that being a mother will be the greatest role of her life, she was castigated by some feminists for implying that all of her personal accomplishments paled in comparison with being a mother.

I think some feminists look down on SAHMs because they think of motherhood as something that just happens to you, not something you had to work at to accomplish. Perhaps that’s true of the pregnancy, but there’s nothing passive about being a mother. Perhaps Portman was thinking of the awesomeness of motherhood when she called it the greatest role, but she will soon find out that it is possibly the hardest role to execute satisfactorily.

Feminists who put down motherhood are wrong on two counts:

First of all, being a mother does not mean that you can’t still accomplish things other than motherhood. Elizabeth Cady Stanton had seven children and she is known as one of the most important First Wave feminists.

Although she enjoyed motherhood and assumed primary responsibility for rearing the children, Stanton found herself unsatisfied and even depressed by the lack of intellectual companionship and stimulation in Seneca Falls. As an antidote to the boredom and loneliness, Stanton became increasingly involved in the community and, by 1848, had established ties to similarly-minded women in the area. By this time, she was firmly committed to the nascent women’s rights movement and was ready to engage in organized activism.

Secondly, a woman can be extremely influential as a mother. Not only can she shape the values of her children, she can also leave her mark on their world by working for causes that impact her children. Most of the women in the book The Maternal is Political write that they became politically motivated precisely because they are mothers.

Wouldn’t it be revolutionary if women went down in history as being as influential as men, not in spite of the fact that they were mothers, but because of it? Cindy Sheehan is a good example. When her son was killed in Iraq, she found her mission in life and became an extremely vocal anti-war activist. However, the fact that she is a woman and mother has diminished her influence in some people’s eyes: they’ve pegged her as some kind of crackpot. Will she be remembered in history as a famous mother? Only time will tell.

 

 

 

Urban Outfitters’ Graphic Tees Ad: What’s Wrong with This Picture?

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Why are the men clothed and the women aren’t (or made to seem that they aren’t)?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Sociological Images.

 

Managing Attention Deficit Disorder at Work and School, Part One

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My sister constantly describes herself as “a hamster running on an exercise wheel.” She swears that she has ADD. Whether she does or not, it’s not surprising that she feels that way. Many women, especially married women with children, are prone to feelings of disorganization, lack of focus, difficulty completing tasks, forgetting to pay bills on time, and missing appointments or deadlines.

The difference is that women with ADD do all these things to the degree that they can barely function. This creates real challenges not only at home, but also at work and in school.

A year ago I wrote the post “If You Have, or Think You Have, ADD.” I intended to write a series of posts about women with ADD, but as is typical for someone who has ADD herself, I forgot. However, I figure it’s better late than never (which is something that people with ADD tell themselves, and others, a lot).

The following are common challenges that women with ADD face at work and in school. (Note: These can apply to anyone who feels overwhelmed by their responsibilities, but they’re particularly troublesome for people with ADD.)

  • Finding it difficult to read large amounts of material.
  • Frequently losing things.
  • Forgetting deadlines.
  • Lack of focus when working in an open space.
  • Having trouble following oral instructions.
  • Managing interruptions.
  • Forgetting names and numbers.
  • Tackling boring tasks.
  • Restlessness (in meetings, in class, etc.).
  • Keeping track of paperwork and email.

To successfully combat these common problems, you have to know yourself. What kind of Attention Deficit Disorder do you have, for instance? There are basically two varieties: ADD with Hyperactivity and ADD, Inattentive. The first is the kind most commonly thought of when people think of ADD. It’s typified by physical restlessness and even acting out. The second is a quieter form of ADD, which means that many people with this type of ADD are not even diagnosed as having it. The person with ADD, Inattentive, is prone to daydreaming and not paying attention in class or meetings.

One of the hardest things for all people with ADD is to stay on task, mainly because they get either bored or distracted.

To keep yourself from being bored, break the task down into short segments and intertwine it with other tasks or activities. In other words, take frequent breaks. But not too frequent! Don’t use this advice as an excuse for giving up on a task before you’ve spent a reasonable amount of time on it.

Distraction is probably the most common problem for a person with ADD. That’s why it’s important to make yourself stick to a task for a set amount of time. Obviously in a class or meeting, the time period is pre-determined and usually feels too long no matter what you do. But somehow you have to make yourself pay attention to everything that’s being said. So how do you do that? I’ll cover some suggestions in “Managing ADD at Work and School, Part Two.”

I’m all for tricks and tips to help you concentrate, but I think it’s important to keep whatever you do simple. When a technique is too complicated, a person with ADD often gets lost in the process. There’s no point in using something that requires more concentration than the material you’re trying to master.

Being easily bored or distracted makes it difficult to get organized. Disorganization is the hallmark of a person with ADD. That doesn’t mean that you can’t be organized. But it’s important to find ways to organize yourself that work for you. Not all people are the same, even all people with ADD. For example, some people have to have complete silence in order to concentrate while others like some kind of  “white noise” to drown out other distractions.

For more background on ADD, especially in women, check out an old blog of mine, ADD Women.

Second Wave Feminists: We’re Not Dead Yet

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As I navigate the Internet searching for feminist resources, I come to an unpleasant conclusion: Second Wave feminists are either all dead or might as well be.

I understand about the generation gap. I do. I know that younger feminists are eager to find their own way in the world. They don’t want to do feminism the way their mothers (and grandmothers!) did it. But do they have to shut us out so completely?

Everything I read is seems to be geared toward girls (or Grrls). Which in itself is weird to me, since feminists from the ’60s and ’70s fought so hard to get people to stop using “girl” or “lady” for “woman.”  (Can you imagine Helen Reddy singing “I Am Girl, hear me roar”? Do you even know who Helen Reddy is??) We felt that to be called a girl was a way of infantilizing us. We wanted to be treated like grown-ups.

I also understand that young feminists don’t give a shit what others think of them, including other feminists (especially older ones). If they want to dress sexy or be obsessed with fashion and makeup, that’s their right. If they want to stay home with their children instead of having careers, that’s their right, too. That doesn’t make them less feminist in their way of thinking.

But what they don’t realize is that older feminists get that. We even admire it to some extent. What we resent is being treated as if our take on being feminine is obsolete. We stress(ed) not getting caught up in the societal attitudes that objectify us.  We didn’t want to be seen as just another pretty face or to be judged by our appearance. We worry that younger feminists are playing into the hands of men who want to keep us in categories they approve: sexual partner, mother, wife, girlfriend, servant.

Which brings us to another difference between Second Wave and subsequent waves of feminists: we blamed men for everything. Or at least we are characterized that way. Actually, we felt that men were as trapped as women were by role expectations and that everyone would be better off if we could break free from those expectations.

I’m not saying that today’s feminists don’t see the sexism in our society. They’re just less likely to blame it on patriarchy. They believe that women have been somewhat complicit in the downgrading of women. And they’re all about taking responsibility for their own choices in life. They don’t want to be hemmed in by what older feminists think is acceptable feminist behavior.

We should have anticipated the generation gap and prepared for our own obsolescence. But instead it seems as if Second Wave feminists have retreated into our middle-aged shells. There’s barely a peep from us on the Internet.

Is it just because we’re old fogeys who haven’t kept up with the times? Is our age to blame for our lack of relevance in the world today?

I’ve used the past tense almost all the way through this post to describe Second Wave feminists. That just goes to show you how even we have bought into the idea that we’re has-beens.

But I for one refuse to lie down and die. I think the Second Wave still has a lot to offer. I even think that Third and Fourth Wave feminists owe us. Without us, they would have neither the opportunities nor the respect that younger women enjoy today.

First Wave feminists prepared the ground for women’s advancement. Second Wave feminists planted the tree. And now today’s feminists are grafting other species onto that tree. What that will mean for the future is anyone’s guess. But we could all use each other’s help to tend what is being created.